A day as a psychotherapist

You've worked as a psychologist for ten years, and have recently completed a part-time training course in psychotherapy. Now, you provide this new 'talking' therapy for many of your NHS patients. At 9am you begin a group therapy session, encouraging a family to interact calmly and happily. By encouraging them to talk frankly about things that have happened in the past, you hope they'll discover the causes of their current feelings of distress. Throughout the day, you counsel individuals and groups - helping them free themselves from stress, emotional problems and relationship issues. You feel your recent psychotherapist training has boosted your ability to help people in distress, and are happy to offer this unique form of therapy.

Does this sound like you?

You have a genuine interest in the feelings of others, and enjoy listening. You can empathise and understand people easily, and are able to learn from your own personal experiences

What's next after GCSE?

After gaining a minimum of 5 A-C grades at GCSE (or the equivalent), you'll be all set to take at least two (preferably three) A levels.

What's next after A level and beyond?

You'll need at least two (ideally three) A levels, or the equivalent, and be ready to do further study at university. You’ll usually need a good class of honours degree in a relevant subject and/or be a qualified and experienced healthcare practitioner, such as a psychiatrist, psychologist, mental health nurse or social worker. Training then usually takes four years, combining study with clinical training under supervision and are provided by a number of organisations, which are usually accredited by the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy, the Association of Child Psychotherapists or the British Psychoanalytic Council.